ATTITUDE OF PARENTS’ TOWARDS NURSERY EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN

 3,000

Description

RESEARCH INFORMATION

[icon type=”icon-pencil”]: ATTITUDE OF PARENTS’ TOWARDS NURSERY EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN
[icon type=”icon-book”]: Chapter 1 – 5
[icon type=”icon-basket”]: #3, 000
[icon type=”icon-doc-line”]: Ms Word format

This study, ATTITUDE OF PARENTS’ TOWARDS NURSERY EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN contains concise information that will serve as a framework or guide for your project work. The project study is well-researched for academic purposes and are usually provided in complete chapters with adequate References.

Keywords: ATTITUDE OF PARENTS’ TOWARDS NURSERY EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN


RESEARCH BODY

ABSTRACT

The present study was aimed at assessing attitude of parents towards nursery the education and schooling of their children. The study analyzed the data from 100 parents, who had one or more than one school going children. Out of these, 116 parents belonged to tribal families and 29 families belonged to non-tribal families. The age range of the sample was 21-50 years, and they all belonged to different communities in Odeda Local Governments area in Ogun State consisting largely of tribal population. A 20-item sub-divided into 4 headings; Attitude of Parents towards schooling and nursery education of their children, the future planning and aspirations of the parents with regards to their child’s education, the level of preparedness of Parents towards Nursery Education and the Challenges facing Parents as a result of Nursery Education. Questionnaire was used for collecting data along with personal interview. The respondents were required to indicate their agreement or disagreement with each of the statements about children’s education in a four-point Likert type scale, where SA denotes strong agreement, A denotes agreement, SD denotes strong disagreement and D denotes disagreement. The attitude of the parent was assessed using simple percentile.  The findings showed that the overall attitude of the respondents was moderately favorable and positive towards schooling and education of their children. The results also indicated that there was no significant difference in the attitude of tribal and non- tribal parents. Gender difference was also found to be non-significant. The difference between tribal and non-tribal respondents was evident in their future plans to provide facilities for higher studies for their children. The study suggested that, although government endeavors at universalizing education has resulted in creating mass awareness and positive response towards schooling and education, there is a lot of scope for improvement in this regard. Future implications of the present study for policy formulation as well as for further research were pointed out.

TABLE OF CONTENT

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1.      Background of the Study

1.2.      Early Childhood Education in Nigeria

1.2.1.   Concept of Early Childhood Care and Education

1.2.2.   Objectives of Early Childhood Education

1.2.3.   Basic Curriculum Provision of National Policy on Pre-Primary Education

1.2.4.   Early Childhood Education and its Problems

1.2.4.1.            Proliferation of Early Childhood Institutions

1.2.4.2.            Quality and Qualification of Teachers

1.2.4.3.            In-effective Supervision of Early Childhood Institutions

1.2.4.5.            Language Policy Implementation

1.2.4.6.            Teacher-Pupil Ratio

1.2.4.7.            Negligence on the Part of Government

1.2.4.8.            Prospects

1.3.      Socio-economic Status and Education

1.4.      Parental Attitude and Involvement in children’s Education

1.5.      Statement of Problem

1.6.      Significance of Study

1.7.      Objective of the study

1.8.      Research Question

1.9.      Operational Definition of Terms

CHAPTER TWO

2.0       LITERATURE REVIEW

2.1       Parental Attitude and Involvement in Children’s Education

2.1.1. Socio-economic Status and Education

2.1.2. Attitude of Parents and Impact on Education

2.1.3. Parental Involvement in Education

2.2.      A brief History of Early Childhood Education in Nigeria

2.3.      Nursery and Primary Education in Nigeria

2.3.1. The Concept of Nursery Education

The concept of Primary Education

Policy Implementation

Pre-primary or Nursery Education

Primary Education

2.4.      The Concept of Management

2.4.1.   Principles of Management

2.4.2.  Pressure to expand Nursery and Primary schools in Nigeria

2.4.3.   Facilities in Nursery and Primary schools

2.4.5.  Establishing Nursery and Primary schools in Nigeria

CHAPTER THREE

3.0.      METHODOLOGY

3.1.      Research Design

3.2.      Population of the Study

3.3.      Sample and Sampling Technique

3.4.      Research Instrument

3.5.      Validity of Research Instrument

3.6.      Method of Data Collection

3.7.      Method of data Analysis

CHAPTER FOUR

RESULT PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS

4.1.      Demographic

4.2.      Attitude of Parents towards Nursery Education of Children

4.2.1.   Attitude of Parents towards schooling and nursery education of their children

4.2.2.   The future planning and aspirations of the parents with regards

to their child’s education

4.2.3.   The level of preparedness of Parents towards Nursery Education

4.2.4.   The Challenges facing Parents as a result of Nursery Education

CHAPTER FIVE

5.0.      SUMMARY OF RESULT, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION

5.1       Summary of the Results

5.1.1.   Overall favorableness of Parental Attitude

5.1.2.   Comparison of tribal and non-tribal respondents

5.1.3.   Gender difference

5.1.4.   Higher Education planning

5.1.4.   Higher Education planning

5.2.      Future Implications or Recommendations

5.3.      Limitations of the Study

References

Questionnaire

CHAPTER ONE

 INTRODUCTION

1.1.      Background of the Study

Parents’ positive attitude towards child’s education is important in determining school attendance and academic achievement of the child. Favorable attitude towards schooling and education enhances parental involvement in children’s present and future studies (Rojalin, 2012). Parent’s attitude towards their children’s education is affected adversely by low socio-economic status and since the tribal constitute the advantaged population, it is expected that the attitude of parents of tribal children will be favorable towards education. However, the present study aims to examine whether the tribal parents, today, exhibit a positive and favorable attitude towards their children’s education as a result of increasing awareness of values of education through Government Endeavour’s and initiatives (Rojalin, 2012).

Parental attitude is a measure or an index of parental involvement. A child, brought up with affection and care in the least restrictive environment would be able to cope up better with the sighted world. Therefore, the family shapes the social integration of the child more than a formal school. Turnbull (2009) has identified four basic parental roles- parents as educational decision makers; parents as parents; parents as teachers and parents as advocates. Since the parent’s attitude is so important, it is essential that the home and school work closely together, especially for children with disabilities. The Warnock Report (2007) stresses the importance of parents being partners in the education of their children. The role of parents should actively support and enrich the educational processes. Korth (2004) states that parents should be recognized as the major teacher of their children and the professional should be considered consultants to parents. Tait (2010) opines that the parents’ psychological well-being and the ease or difficulties with which they decipher the cues that facilitate the socialization process influence the personal and social development of the child. It is the parents who exert the major influence on the development of the child from birth to maturity. One of the most important attributes of parental attitude is consistency. As children mature into adolescence, family involvement in their learning remains important. Family involvement practices at home and at school have been found to influence secondary school students’ academic achievement, school attendance, and graduation and college matriculation rates (Dornbusch and Ritter, 2011). Despite its importance, however, families’ active involvement in their children’s education declines as they progress from elementary school to middle and high school (Epstein, 2003). Research suggests that schools can reverse the decline in parent involvement by developing comprehensive programs of partnership (Epstein, 2002).

1.2.      Early Childhood Education in Nigeria

In Nigeria, organized education of the child below primary school age did not receive official recognition until very recently, receive the attention it deserved. The concept of infant schools was introduced in Nigeria by the missionaries in the early 20th century when such schools were set up in the Western and Eastern regions of Nigeria. Early Childhood education in the form of nursery school or pre-primary education as we know it today in Nigeria is largely a post-colonial development. The semblances of it during the colonial era were the Kindergarten and infant classes, which consisted of groups of children considered not yet ready for primary education. As groping for instruction in schools was not age-based during that period, some children aged six or even more, could be found in some of the infant classes (Tor-Anyiin, 2008). With the phasing out of infant classes, some parents began to feel the need for nursery schools.

During that period, (pre-independence) all efforts for provision of early childhood education were confined to the voluntary sector and received little or no support from the government (Tor-Anyiin, 2008). It was for the first time in 1977 with the introduction of National Policy on Education by the then military government of Nigeria that the importance and need for early childhood education was given official recognition and linked with the child’s educational performance in primary school. Gradually, early childhood institution stayed, and by 1985, Nigeria had about 4200 early childhood educational institutions. While by 1992 the number increased to about 8,300 (Federal Government of Nigeria/UNICEF 2003).

Nowadays, early childhood educational institutions are located in various places and buildings campuses of universities and Colleges, premises of some industries and business organizations, church premises, residential buildings with unprecedented expansion owing to the high demand for early childhood care and education by parents (Ejieh, 2006).

Keywords: ATTITUDE OF PARENTS’ TOWARDS NURSERY EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN


[divider height=”30″ style=”default” line=”default” themecolor=”1″]

[alert style=”warning”]NOTE: INSTANT DOWNLOAD SERVICE [/alert]

Have you made payment for this project? If YES, Get a Download Code by contacting our Customer Care.

For further enquiries, call our Hotlines: (+234) 0816-531-2322, 0811-998-2823

[divider height=”30″ style=”default” line=”default” themecolor=”1″]

PROJECT TOPICS AND MATERIALS | HIRE A WRITER | HOW TO PAY FOR PROJECT

Keywords: ATTITUDE OF PARENTS’ TOWARDS NURSERY EDUCATION OF THEIR CHILDREN

Build in-demand skills and earn valuable credentialsSTART A COURSE
+ +