08165312322, 08182677240, 08165312322
hello@myproject.com.ng

INFLUENCE OF FAMILY BACKGROUND ON THE LEARNING ATTITUDE OF STUDENTS TOWARDS SEX EDUCATION IN NDOKWA WEST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF DELTA STATE

 3,000

Sold By: myProject

RESEARCH INFORMATION

PROJECT TOPIC : INFLUENCE OF FAMILY BACKGROUND ON THE LEARNING ATTITUDE OF STUDENTS TOWARDS SEX EDUCATION IN NDOKWA WEST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF DELTA STATE

CHAPTERS: Chapter 1 – 5
PRICE : #3, 000
FORMAT: Ms Word

This study, INFLUENCE OF FAMILY BACKGROUND ON THE LEARNING ATTITUDE OF STUDENTS TOWARDS SEX EDUCATION IN NDOKWA WEST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF DELTA STATE contains concise information that will serve as a framework or guide for your project work. The project study is well-researched for academic purposes and are usually provided in complete chapters with adequate References.

Keywords: sex education, attitude of students towards sex

RESEARCH BODY

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

Background to the Study

Sex education is the study whereby information is given or imparted on a group of young ones and which takes into account the development, growth, the anatomy and physiology of the human reproductive system and physiology of the human reproductive system and challenges that occur from youth all through stages of adulthood (Aboguni, 2003).

Sex education is the acquisition of knowledge that deals with human sexuality. It consists of instruction on the development of an undertraining of the physical, mental, emotional social, economical and psychological phases of human relatives as they are affected by sex. In other words, sex education involves providing children with knowledge and concept that will enable them make informed and responsible decision about sexual behaviours at all stages of their lives. It is however, so unfortunate that this knowledge is not well received by a large amount of Nigerian students at the adolescent or teenage stage of life (Ogunnimi, 2006).

The need for sex education in school has become indispensable in today’s contemporary societies. While many societies and culture around the world are yet to consent to the introduction of sex education in schools mostly because of their social-cultural beliefs, system, political system, religion, etc. some countries see sex education as a gate-way to deal with issues related to reproductive, health and sexual preference among teenagers. Sexual health is one of the five core aspects of the World Health Organizations (WHO) global reproductive health strategy approved by the World Health Organization in 2004 (WHO, 2004). According to WHO (2004), sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy and reproduction.

In Europe, sexuality education is in the first place personal growth oriented, whereas in the United States of American, it is primarily problem-solving or prevention oriented. There are a wide variety for this fundamental difference that cannot be discussed and developed during adolescence, is not primarily perceived as a problem and threat but as a man datory print of school education since 1956. The subject usually starts between the ages of 7 and 10 and continues through the grades incorporated into different subjects such as biology, social studies and history.

On the other hand, in England sex education is not compulsory in schools as parents refused to let their children take part in the lessons. This scenario is only noticed in Nigeria. The curriculum focuses on the reproductive system, foetal development and safe sex is discretionary and discussion about relationships is often neglected. Britain has one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in Europe and sex education is a heated issue in government and media reports (Huffstulfer, 2007).

In most African context especially in Nigeria, sex education is seen as a taboo to be talked about (Eko et al., 2013). Generally, adolescent are not allowed to have access to sexual health information because the society have the perception that such exposure will corrupt the child and he or she may likely be a victim of early sexual intercourse. In contrast, teachers had positive attitude towards teaching of sex education in schools (Ayyoba, 2011).

Nevertheless, several studies in Nigeria have validated the introduction of sex education in schools (Akinde and Akinde, 2007). Schools are privileged settings for formal anticipated sex education as children and adolescents of time at school and other agents of sex education like the internet and other media can provide non-structured education.

Statement of the Problem

About 50% of the world population are under the age of 20years and are at the highest risk of sexual and reproductive health problems. This has made sexually the root of most sexual and reproductive health problems. This has made sexuality the root of most sexual and reproductive health challenges. According to a United Nations report, 56% and 15% of females within the age cohort of 15-19years and out of which a total of 18million people within the age group of 15-24years makes 19% of Nigerian’s population.

About one million teenagers (girls) annually get pregnant with resultant 44% births, 50% of those drop out of school and 50% are unmarried and young mothers placing infants at enormous health risks. A study carried out in Benin City, Nigeria revealed that 55% of secondary school girls have had sexual intercourse by age of 16years and 40% admitted to at least one previous pregnancy.

Adolescents indulgence in high risk sexual behavior consciously or unconsciously often result in unwanted pregnancy. Unsafe abortion, sexually transmitted infections single or early parenthood and school dropout. This has contributed to poor health indices in Nigeria.

Obviously, these sexual health problems are inseparable without adequate and appropriate sex education. For this to be possible, parents and teachers must give their consent for sex education to be inculcated into the school curriculum and taught in schools. Since most students see their parents as role models and tends to emulate their life style and listen to what they say, it is necessary the family background be checked to ascertain the level of influence or impact on learning of sex education in secondary schools. Hence, it is with this context that this study is necessitated.

Children’s sexuality may develop during early or middle childhood but during adolescent, their sexuality is brought to sharper focus. Sexual identity desires and the formation of sexual identity are more pronounce in adolescents. These events may occur as a result of puberty, how one’s friend and family respond to a more adult-like appearance, social moves regarding time and place spent with romantic partners and cultural messages that shape one’s view of oneself as a sexual being.

These increase feeling of arousal or desire manifest themselves in a variety of non-coital and coital thought and can be fravious. These includes masturbation and sexual intercourse as the case may be. Masturbation is believed to be normative adolescents sexual experiences and parent rarely talk about it to their teens as a normal sexual outcome while sexual intercourse is the behaviour used most often to report on the status of adolescent’s sexual behaviour but, because of the potential long-term consequences of intercourse, it is the most often reported.

Research Questions

The following research questions were posed to guide this study:

  1. Does parental awareness and knowledge of sex education has influence on the learning attitudes of students?
  2. Can perception of parents on sex education influence the learning attitude of students?
  3. Does the cultural beliefs of the family has influence on the learning attitude of students towards sex education?
  4. Does family religion has influence on the learning attitude of students towards sex education?
  5. Does the level of illiteracy of the parents has influence towards the learning of sex education by students?

Research Hypothesis

The following null hypothesis were formulated to guide this study:

  1. Parental awareness and knowledge of sex education does not have influence on the learning attitudes of students
  2. Perception of parents on sex education cannot influence the learning attitude of students
  3. The cultural beliefs of the family does not have influence on the learning attitude of students towards sex education
  4. Family religion does not have influence on the learning attitude of students towards sex education
  5. The level of illiteracy of parents does not have influence on the learning attitude of students towards sex education

Purpose of the Study

The basic study is to determine the influence of family background on the learning attitude and behaviour of students towards sex education in Ndokwa West Local Government Area of Delta State.

Specifically, the study will address the following:

  1. The influence of parental awareness and knowledge of sex education on the learning attitude of students towards sex education
  2. The influence of perception of parents on sex education on the learning attitude of students towards sex education
  3. The influence of perception of parents on sex education on the learning attitude of students towards sex education
  4. The influence of cultural beliefs of the family on the learning attitudes of students towards sex education
  5. The influence of illiteracy of parents towards the learning of sex education by students

 

Significance of the Study  

Sex education fulfils the highly needed function of sexuality health promotion. On this profile, it will primarily serve as a baseline survey for further research on sex education and students counselling and academics. This study is also imperative for adolescents boys and girls as it will guarantee them a reputable future and acquire life skills to deal with sexuality and relationship in a satisfactory and responsible manner.

Religious organisations, policy makers, educators, parents and community leaders will find recommendations from this study useful as it will guide them in formulating effective policies in favour of sex education in schools, intensify campaign on the need to include sex education in school curriculum. Exposing any myths and misconception concerning sex education in African societies and facilitate equitable access to sexual and reproductive health education.

Data generated from this study will be informative to the government, non-governmental and the public health system in planning and implementation programmes in schools.

Scope of the Study

The present study is limited to the influence of family background on the learning behaviours or attitude of students in selected secondary schools in Ndokwa West Local Government Area of Delta State. Five secondary school will be selected.

However, the following findings of the research will be applicable to all local government areas in Delta State. Five secondary schools will be selected and a sample of one hundred and fifty (150) students will be selected as follows:

  1. Apex Model School, Kwale
  2. Utagba-Ogbe grammar School, Kwale
  3. Universal School, Kwale
  4. St Philips Academy, Kwale
  5. Seat of Wisdom Academy, Kwale

Definition of Terms

The following terms were used in the context explained below:

Sex: This is the state of being a male or female.

Education: This is the process or act of imparting knowledge, skill and judgement. It is also known as teaching in a particular field of endeavour

Sex Education: It is the learning and teaching of human sexuality adolescent reproductive health and sexual intercourse

Family: It is first, a society a person stays or the home where he/she was born. The family is the smallest unit of the society that comprises the mother, father and children

Attitude: This is the behaviour of an individual, especially towards a practices, cultures, subject or person.

Keywords: sex education, attitude of students towards sex

Not the topic you are looking for? Search here




Choose what you want by category

PROJECT TOPICSHIRE A WRITER
CUSTOMIZED ESSAYFREE ONLINE COURSES
MAKE PAYMENT(S)DOWNLOAD PROJECT(S)





Need Help? Chat with us